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The Gardening Thread

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Comments

  • @basement_shaman - It honestly hadn't occurred to me that I could bring pepper plants indoors to harvest in the Winter. I have a good sun room on the back of my house with a woodstove usually going when the temps get low, so that might be a perfect place to Winter those.

    I also never heard of starting peppers in November. That could be quite a learning experience.

  • My chillies have not just stopped fruiting, but dropped their leaves too. No more chillies for me this year.
  • @cpmcdill super hots take a long time to grow. Full grown plants in the spring will produce larger yield sooner and survive better with questionable weather. Strengthen the little guys with a circulating fan about an hour a day  turn them often as you remember so  they grow straight . shape them into a nice shape for the whole plant gets light. you can remove leaves at any time so the plant isn't crowded . when the flowers open you have to pollinate by hand. you can just shake the bush or use a cotton swab and go from flower to flower. You want to cross breed with another plant this is how it is done. You can also graft other peppers onto one plant to use less space . There are a ton of you tube how to videos on the subject. You can even graft a tomato onto a potato plant.    
    My knowledge is worthless if not shared and applied . "Joseph McKenna"  
  • haemonyhaemony Member
    edited September 2017 PM

  • edited September 2017 PM
    Also when plant just start to flower , mix epson salts with water and give them a nice shower . Indoor peppers should be watered from the bottom when the top soil is dry. you will get a better root system. the more water the less heat. some like to do indoor hydroponic it won't do much for the heat level except lower it. best for bells and others meaty peppers.  

    When using fertilizer it best to add at the end of the growing season. Too much fresh will produce plants and not fruit. Or have well aged compost to mix in the spring when turning the soil. I like to cover my plot with 4 inches of grass clipping after turned. then clear a spot for each plant. keeps the soil moist and weed free all season. 

    When planting full size tomato I dig a trench  remove the first two sets of bottom leaves and plant  lengthwise  with roots facing the prevailing wind. this will send up more shoots from the root system and the plant will produce plenty strong large fruits. Just remember where to drive your support stakes 
    My knowledge is worthless if not shared and applied . "Joseph McKenna"  
  • Great advice! Thanks, @basement_shaman.

  • @50ft_trad I just inherited a potted fig tree and was told the secret to getting it to fruit properly is 12-12-12 fertilizer about once a month. 
  • @crullers One thing I did when I first got the tree, was repot it into a much larger pot, not realising they do much better when rootbound. It might be that it's taken this long to get a sufficient root density to get it to start trying to fruit. Also, we have had a particularly poor summer this year, so the "season" might just not have been long enough. I will certainly bear your suggestion in mind for next year though.
  • Picked a few chocolate habanero & Red Savina 20170920_104253
    My knowledge is worthless if not shared and applied . "Joseph McKenna"  
  • Latest photo of plants since August 21. Starting to harvest for air cure. Soon will all get chopped or moved to warmer climate.

    IMG_20171025_133302
    IMG_20171025_133623
    IMG_20171025_133559


    Some done and ready for hanging.
    IMG_20171026_100021
  • A landscape for my chickens
  • Hare in my a-- before Easter to get a few new to me tobacco varieties of seed and starts to dirt in green house. Trying earlier this season as they always fall short of full fill out and less ripe leaves then I'd like with shorter summers at my location.
    As I'm a pot grower of tobacco. I'm going to try getting some this season to real base line earth. Pots work for a period of time but once established I will put some to direct groundbut way more work. Hope I can grow more quality leaf this year with less effort I hope.
    Bigger pots I know will help but direct earth I know is the best bed for tobacco.
    Soil prep and pest guard is the only way this will work for better yield this way tho, takes more effort.
    Have starters of a few variety available currently just north of me available in hot house in pots and some new seeds to baby up that I've acquired.
    Just need winter to sprung out of action and spring to do it's thing.





  • volungevolunge Member
    edited February 27 PM
    Grounded they will grow muuuch bigger! Just watch out for fall frost, it's the killer.
    Nice 2017 harvest @nicmizer!

  • I'm getting ready to germinate seeds as well:

    Ohio Dutch
    Yellow Twist Bud
    Goose Creek Red
    Basma

    All air-cured varieties as Flue Curing is not an option.  

  • @cobguy do you have cobs ? i love cobs and been using them for a while.

    and i germed some tobacco but the pots i used (made from decomposing material) seem crappy and i see mold/fungus (long hairs with glandules) on the sprouted seeds (took 2 days) so i might have to redo this will see how it looks tomorrow

    4 different tobaccos:
    burles jupiter
    virginnia golta
    brasil
    nicotina asiatica
  • CobguyCobguy Member
    @SunnyDay ... as the name implies, I am a huge proponent of the Cobs.   \:D/

    Also, an update to my previous post ... a DIY Flue-Cure chamber is underway which will also serve as a Kiln for fermentation.  Still planning on air curing most of the leaf but will experiment with some in the chamber.


  • @cobguy oh yes i still have to look into curing and fermenting which seems to be the hardest part of tobacco production
    the little plants are growing still tiny and crowded in pots i will wait a bit then just rip out all but 3 on each side of the pot and then later go down to one before planting (made 5 pots of each of the 4 varities)
    i am glad i didnt plant them out already because we have snow right now
  • i planted 8 tiny seedlings out and prepared a bed for 12 more i need to get some good earth but cant buy it until thuesday stores are closed

    its too early and they are still very very small but i did work fertilizing the beds and put funghi and bacteria to aid the plants and those need a while to get established anyways so if the plants should freeze or drown i still have loads more inside i just need to replace the bed will be ready
  • CobguyCobguy Member

    Here's the babies so far:


    babybaccy
  • CobguyCobguy Member

    Man ... I've got a ton of thinning to do! 



  • volungevolunge Member
    edited March 31 PM
    Mixing tobacco seeds with sand before pouring them to soil helps to save some time on thinning.
    And economize the seeds, too.
  • SunnyDaySunnyDay Member
    edited March 31 PM
    the ones i set out were twice the size like on your photo @cobguy still small though
    3 leaves

    some are smaller some bigger
    rustica asiatica is biggest seedlings
  • nn


    WP_20180420_052[1]
  • uss
  • SunnyDaySunnyDay Member
    edited May 12 PM
    kkk

    growing well except im having a little problem with weak stems (some are thin as a match)
    i think this was due to them being so long on the windowsill before
    but im not worried if some plants dont make it overall i hope to get some to at least experiment with snuff and snusmaking a bit :-B
  • ar47ar47 Member
    edited May 12 PM
    Yeah weak stems typically come from no/low airflow so could be from being on the window sill
  • SunnyDaySunnyDay Member
    edited May 12 PM
    yeh that could be it @ar47 there has been no wind nor any rain for over a month since they been outside
  • volungevolunge Member
    @SunnyDay, they look normal at this age. Your plants are still low, so no way wind could damage them now. Stems will get stronger as the plants grow. The only danger is hail, which can perforate leaves badly, but if you are not going to roll cigars, no worries, tobacco survives it.
  • SunnyDaySunnyDay Member
    edited May 14 PM
    edited: i posted a gif but it did not play

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