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need snuff now

dasrdasr Member
Ive run out of snuff and need it now. Kind of panic. Is there some Europe site that offer fast shipping?
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Comments

  • dasrdasr Member
    Can someone sell me some Taxi red maybe?
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 8 PM
    Before the quarantine, snuff.me.uk used to be the fastest supplier. All my orders arrived in 5 business days. They don't have SA snuffs, but you can try F&T Princes and Santo Domingo.

    On the other hand, it's the right time for trying your hand at making your own snuff. If you are in Sweden, you can use snussats - tobacco is already ground in them, all you need to do is add sodium carbonate and salt, dissolved in water, and thoroughly mix. You can start using it next morning. Sure, it will taste better and deliver more nicotine after a few days and will definitely become better with time.

    If you like coarse grind, order coarse (grov) snussat. They are ridiculously cheap, prices of 1 kg raw tobacco flour starts at 205 kr (19.33 EUR), you can make about 1.6 kg moist plain snuff (with 31% moisture content) from it (1000 g of tobacco, 500 g of water, 65 g of sodium carbonate, 50 g of salt; in percents: 62% tobacco, 31% water, 4% sodium carbonate, 3% salt.

    MAKING SNUFF IS SUPER EASY, MUCH EASIER THAN MAKING SNUS!

    You'll be surprised how good your own homemade is.
  • volungevolunge Member
    https://www.snusbolaget.se/gora-eget-snus/snussatser-los/#p=2

    Read the descriptions and check nicotine content. You can use filter and choose Extra Strong and Starkt flour.

    If you decide to order coarse flour (grov) and find it too coarse, use mortar and pestle to grind it finer to your liking. Make small batch first (10-100 g).

    Just a few examples:

    Clipboard01
    Coobra


    Grov



    Kungssnus


    Hardcore
  • dasrdasr Member
    edited May 8 PM
    @volunge just mix it and let it sit or? What temp of water?
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 8 PM
    If you need something right now and can't wait, get a can of los snus (say, Ettan Los or Grov Los), spread it on a baking sheet, reduce the moisture at low temperature in the oven, regrind with a spoon - that's it. Ingredient-wise it's the same as nasal snuff; the only difference is higher moisture content and glycerol (which is rarely used for nasal snuff), but it doesn't impart the taste, taken nasally. I have tried it, it's ok.

    Worth checking Ettan Original Portion, it's glycerol-free, contains more sodium carbonate than los version and should deliver more nicotine. It does contain some propylene glycol (just like los), but the amount present is close to that of some German nasal snuffs. Moisture content is similar to fresh South African snuffs, but the texture is somewhat more messy. Tear apart portion, pour out the tobacco and take a pinch. Don't hesitate, Swedish snus is safer than nasal snuff. If you find the tobacco in Ettan Original Portions too moist and messy, reduce the moisture in the oven and grind it finer. Just don't dry out all the moisture completely.

    You can check the ingredients of Swedish Match snus here: https://www.swedishmatch.com/Our-business/smokefree/Ingredients-in-snus/ and compare with nasal snuff composition: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vTfVlO6mal6dVhw8jFVMPx5VIW1wWoLyHO3j2zXON_BzXT5GywSASHmfiOEaoF2nQBsuhqEKSS41c0C/pubhtml?gid=0&single=true (take a glance at "Gekach [=Gekachelter Virginie] column, it's plain and very simple snuff with medium nicotine content, and compare it with Ettan Original Portion composition, using the first link above).

    This is your fastest option. Or simply use snus as intended, in the lip. Best sub for snuff.


  • dasrdasr Member
    edited May 8 PM
    nevermind
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 8 PM
    @dasr, yes, dissolve sodium carbonate and salt in warm water (you don't need to measure temp) and simply mix it with the tobacco flour, following the ratio in my first reply. Mix it well, it takes time; repeat mixing several times in the course of the first day for best result. I find it absolutely enjoyable after two days, and like I said before, it gets better with the time; I always start consuming it in the next morning, when it's still tastes somewhat raw (ammonia is already there, tho). You can try different proportions of water (10-35%), salt (0-6%) and sodium carbonate (2-10%). If you don't have sodium carbonate, get sodium bicarbonate and convert it to sodium carbonate in an oven (30 minutes in preheated oven at 220 C does the full conversion, it's 100% reliable and used by many, including myself).

    Using precision scales is a must! 0.1 g precision is enough; for small batches and adding flavours/menthol, opt for 0.01 g ones.

    Keeping moist coarse snuff warm for the first 2-4 days makes it darken ("black"). 40-55 C.
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 8 PM
  • dasrdasr Member
    Yea I know they suck
  • While on the topic, I have a question @volunge . I have an old pack of American Spirit Perique cigarettes from before I quit smoking. I was thinking of grinding down the tobacco for snuff. Would the tobacco already be alkalized if it is coming from cigarettes?
    Also, just because I have it on hand, what percentage of sodium bicarbonate/ baking soda and water could I use. If scenting it with bergamot, would I put the essential oil directly in or use a method to indirectly scent it?
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 8 PM
    @boiledonions, according to BMEL data, NAS Perique cigarettes are additives-free, made of pure tobacco (at least those, sold in Germany). You need to alkalize it and add a dash of salt.

    I haven't tried sodium bicarbonate as alkalizer yet, only carbonate. I'm afraid bicarbonate might impair the taste of snuff (I'm not too fond of baking powder taste, old childhood trauma of mine - granny's pancakes...). Bicarbonates are weaker alkalizers (max pH is 8.27; the aim is to achieve at least 8.4) than carbonates and are rarely used as standalone pH modifiers for snuff. You can easily convert sodium/potassium bicarbonate to carbonate. Compare pH: https://www.aqion.de/site/191 .

    After trying different tobacco, water, sodium carbonate/potassium carbonate and salt ratios, I came to a conclusion that 4% of sodium carbonate is my happy mean. Salt - anywhere from 2 to 4%. Water - 20-35%. Higher moisture (25-35%) speeds up "fermentation". Here I'm referring to "fast snuff" only - the one which turns enjoyable in a mere three days. Higher amounts of alkalizers facilitates faster nicotine uptake, but result in sharper nose burn, extra drip and the loss of natural tobacco aroma (when air cured leaf used). Too much salt adds to the nose burn and causes nasty drip. Lower amounts of alkalizer, as well as lower moisture, does the trick only in prolonged maturation, which takes months. Many recipes of "slow snuffs" call for the addition of ammonium chloride, which I find unnnecessary for a "three-days wonder". I'm really tempted to procure a small 1 l oaken pickling cask and finally run my first "large" batch, properly ageing snuff for 6-9 months.

    Essential oils are added directly, either mixed into the alkaline sauce or thinned with a small amount of 95-96% ethanol, if added to ready-made snuff (you'll need to air the ethanol out after scenting). 1 ml (20 drops) for 100 g of snuff. I would start with 1 drop of oil (thinned with 1 ml ethanol for easier mixing) per 10 g of ready-made snuff.
  • Awesome! Thanks @volunge . I will run a small test batch this week and keep you posted on results
  • dasrdasr Member
    @volunge Stuffed my cheeks full of knox dark snus. Sent my heads spinning 100miles per hourr in the stars. Oh Lord I will survive I will survive Ma Maam is here with me
  • volungevolunge Member
    Snus is good. Sounds like you just got a new "hobby" ;). Variety is astounding, it takes some good time to explore them all. Try Makla Ifrikia someday, it tastes different, but hits harder than extreme snus.
  • dasrdasr Member
    edited May 11 PM
    @volunge Thank God some snuff has arrived. Someone said best to avoid South African Singleton
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 11 PM
    Please tell more about that SA Singleton, once you try it. Very curious about this one. How's the grind, colour, moisture, menthol and nic level etc. Also interested to know, how long did the shipping take?
  • dasrdasr Member
    edited May 11 PM
    Ok Im not very good at describing but it seems typical South African. On the coarser side. Nice strong tobacco taste. Menthol is nice not too much. A bit drier than the other ones I should say and a bit finer grind. Seems strong nicotine and it took 10 days.
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 11 PM
    Thanks, @dasr! I wasn't sure if it's typical SA, or more akin to lighter British mentholated snuffs, so hesitated at ordering it.
  • dasrdasr Member
    edited May 11 PM
    @Volunge Im not very familiar with british snuffs. Its probably close to them too. Something inbetween maybe. But anyway its very good. I tried Sir Walter Scotts Ramon Pane and somehow reminds me of that but it was some time ago I had that. Obviously without the menthol. 
  • volungevolunge Member
    Could you upload a pic of the snuff? Open can, that is. Would appreciate that!
  • dasrdasr Member
    image
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 11 PM
    What a snuffbox! Thanks for the pic, I'll include this African Singleton's in my next order. Grind/moisture/colour is similar to that of most English menthols. If you are interested in trying them, good start could be Wilsons of Sharrow Singleton's Super Cool. I can bet you would enjoy it - it matches your liking, being dark and moist (another dark one is Viking ISS). Grind is similar or even a tad coarser.
  • dasrdasr Member
    I wonder if Big mamma in SA uses theses snuffs
  • volungevolunge Member
    edited May 12 PM
    @boiledonions, I just scented 5 g of plain fine dry snuff (6P Krishan Sudama) with one drop of bergamot essential oil (pure, not thinned with ethanol), adding it directly and stirring with a spoon for a couple of minutes. Seems like a righteous amount, definitely not overdone, very enjoyable. Tin note is much stronger than the flavour in the nose, it doesn't linger for too long. A very familiar flavour that is (saying "Hello!" to Tom Buck :)). Backdrip isn't neither harsh nor irritating.

    As noted on the label of my bergamot e.o. bottle, it blends nicely with cypress, juniper, lavender, lemon-balm, neroli and all citrus oils, but it's great on its own. Just took another panch, delightful thing.
  • @volunge I have it a shot at homemade. I ended up using about 10 dried out Panter Blue cigarillos. Ground them down in a mortar and pestle and seived through a tea ball. It took some work, but I ended up with 3.4 grams of flour. To that I added a sauce made of 6% (.3g) sodium bicarbonate, 2% salt (.1g), 25% (1.27g) water and 2 drops of bergamot essential oil. I meant to only add 1 drop of oil. Oops! It has been fermenting for 2 days now.

    The grind is pretty coarse, close to Thrice Brewed. In the tin, the bergamot is strong but not overwhelming. Just took the first pinch and I mostly getting barnyard notes right now. I do not have the biggest tolerance to nicotine, and I am definitely getting some from this. I was not able to detect any baking soda scent, but like I said, the barnyard/ stable scent is really over powering right now. I will get back to you as it mellows.

    This is fun! I am already thinking of what to do next.

    Should I leave a lid on or off as it sits and ferments for the first few days after mixing? I have been doing a little bit of both so far.
  • volungevolunge Member
    Ammonia/barnyard notes usually goes away in a week. If you tolerate it, don't air it - airing will happen naturally, opening tin for taking a pinch. As far as I understand, in the course of the first 3-5 days (during the peak of "fermentation/brewing" phase) ammonia is inevitable, and airing it results in significant moisture loss, which might slow down the brewing and "lock" the ammonia for longer.

    I procured some bicarb as well and will run a small batch with it. Good to hear it doesn't impair the scent! After all, some manufacturers use bicarbonate, too. Could be the case with Neffa Ifrikia - similar Tunisian rustica snuff Neffa Souffi contains both carbonate and bicarbonate (92% rustica, 8% texture agents (carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, water)).
  • Cool, thanks for all the info! I have a pouch of Prince Albert burley pipe tobacco that I will never go through, so I am thinking of using some of that for the next batch. The main scent I get from it is dried plum. I am going to keep some totally plain with a little salt and bicarbonate, and would like to try scenting the rest with bourbon or brandy. Would I add a tiny amount of the alcohol directly to the sauce as I did with essential oil? Or should I maybe do half water/ half booze in the sauce? Would too much alcohol prevent fermentation?
  • volungevolunge Member
    Not really sure, but I suppose the "fermentation" (or, using older term - "brewing") we are talking about is not actual fermentation; ferments are not playing any role in this process - it's more about nicotine freebasing, that is, the penetration of alkalis and moisture into the cells of powdered tobacco, if I get it all right. Certainly, more interesting things happen during the alkalization (the break down of a certain amount of nicotine (that's where ammonia comes from) and other compounds, as well as their interaction), which all change the organoleptic properties of the snuff.

    However, carbonates and bicarbonates are insoluble in alcohol and most probably are barely soluble in stronger beverages (even cut with water at half/half ratio), so it might inhibit or slow down "fermentation" (alkalization). I would use bourbon or brandy for scenting in the final stage, mixing it with already alkalized snuff ("fermented" for at least 3 days). For the life of me I can't find the data on carb/bicarb solubilities in ethanol-water mixtures. Unfortunately, I have almost ran out of pure ethanol (literally, a couple millilitres left) and don't have any beverages at home, so can't run the test.
  • dasrdasr Member
    So which snuffs has this "manure" scent? Makla? I like to think of it as elephant
  • Interesting discusion. 
    I never got so far to make some microbiological observations on the "fermentation" proces. I think however that addition of alkali can promote the growth of specific micoorganisms  which might be responsible for the "manure" scent.

    Jaap Bes.
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