Get 50% off selected FUBAR snuffs. Finest Quality Indian SnuffsToque Snuffs

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Sign In with Google Sign In with OpenID






Please consider helping to support the Snuffhouse forum.

Get 50% off selected 6 Photo snuffs.

Scent vs taste

Hello !

I just wanted to ask you all something regarding these two senses. When it comes to tobacco, it was always associated with taste (cigarettes , pipe , arghelih , etc). Somehow Whenever I snuff , it feels really good and takes care of craving for a while. But I still dont feel satisfied in the way of my taste facilties not being used. Anyone else have this ? I currently snus 80% ofthe time due to this reason, and I really dont see myself using snuff 100% of the time for that reason.

Comments

  • I am not a neuroscientist, but I posit:
    the olfactory system is the only sensory input to go directly to the brain bypassing an organ on the brain stem called the amygdala. The amygdala is responsible for emotion which is ultimately biochemical and reacts readily to physiological events (as opposed to events that cause these reactions which are perceived by the senses - even thoughts have this power thus for example, meditative techniques releasing dopamine).
    smoking is oral and this sense is directed to the brain through the amygdala. Nicotine I posit, releases dopamine and ephenedrine which are feel good and increased intensity chemicals (respectively). I might add here that dopamine is good for muscle tone and weight loss as a precursor to HGH. Of course the nicotine itself is a thermogenic agent.
    with oral intake the amygdala is directly involved and I would guess this affects MAO (a chemical associated with mood) and tickles the adrenal cortex to releases beta blockers (and I am out on a limb here but am reasonably sure) which calms reducing stress.
    The mouth has far more receptor sights as do the lips. Especially the lips with many "sense of touch nerve sites" and sub lingual where cigs and snus are best absorbed and provide the greatest tactility.
    As per Horus' valued comments; use of mentholated tobacco is better as tobacco contains continine which breaks down quickly. menthol preserves it and it is a natural relaxant.
    I will be supplementing my snuff with snus smoked in an ecig asap.

    I have only mentioned the amygdala 4 times just missing the 5 amygdala badge.
  • edited May 2013 PM
    I sense Scent with my nose and taste with my tongue, the only time I taste snuff is when it is going down my throat. I do get perturbed When snuff is referred to as flavor rather then scent ,being that a flavor is a taste rather than a scent. although favor is processed through taste and smell combined, If you lost you sense of smell, food would taste different and you would think it lost it's flavor; Artificial flavors used to scent snuff then have flavored snuff.

    Personal I refer to a snuff as it scent, not as a flavor. But it has it's place ,like if your doing a taste test with snuff your really not tasting it. or you give a small sample it could be referred to as a taste. Or the first time trying something.
    My knowledge is worthless if not shared and applied . "Joseph McKenna"  
  • XanderXander Member
    Technically the human tongue can only "taste" 4 different things; sweet, salty, bitter, sour. Its remarkably accurate in distinguishing degrees of those four, but it can't distinguish flavors from each other. That's all done in the nose.
  • The primary olfactory cortex, in which higher-level processing of olfactory information takes place, forms a direct link with the amygdala and the hippocampus. Only two synapses separate the olfactory nerve from the amygdala, which is involved in experiencing emotion and also in emotional memory (Herz & Engen, 1996).

  • The primary olfactory cortex, in which higher-level processing of olfactory information takes place, forms a direct link with the amygdala and the hippocampus. Only two synapses separate the olfactory nerve from the amygdala, which is involved in experiencing emotion and also in emotional memory (Herz & Engen, 1996).

    @@......That's what she said
    @@@.. That's what he spread
    @@@@....Toast and marmalade
  • Juxtaposer - I always appreciate learning something. I will return the favor by suggesting you place 2 blankets between you and your significant other during an erotic moment, only 2 layers of etparation not 3 or 4. The olfactory is more connected to the hippocampus which is why memory is most strongly evoked by smell. Buy it is nice that you are doing research.
    And I forgot endorphin release perhaps connected to dopamine.
  • It really does depend on the type of blankets and not really how many of them.
  • bobbob Member
    crazy fact. The lung has taste buds.
  • n9inchnailsn9inchnails Moderator
    ^nope ,you heard it on Curb Your Enthusiasm and you know it ;)
  • I'm not a hasid but it is not a general practice. Among the Haredi it is sometimes a custom, but they are stuck in the 5th century as are crypto christians, some Islamic sub-sects (not to be confused with sub-sex where the woman is alway sub). (but most jews are circumcised reflecting their pessimism, as opposed to, for example, the Irish who are great optimists and believe that they will just wear it off). If they did not have holes cut into them (the blankets to be clear) they would not have such large families. This reasoning is akin to the paint job on a car: once you are in and driving the paint does not matter.
    Re: Herz & Engen: they wrote based on 1994 and some 1995 research. That was about (not sure exactly) the third generation of commercial MRIs
    and Positron Emission Tech was at best an exotic infant. As I'm sure you know computers double in power every 2 years. In that both methods (mri and pet) are computer and tech dependent.... So the book was done 19 years ago before 10s of thousands of hours of Pet scans devoted to how the senses work (among other things). Wikpedia or where ever is not one of the peer reviewed journals.
    I posited a theory. If you think it is incorrect posit something better. As others are aware, based on my numerous posts with questions, I am eager to learn. The word learn is tattooed above the hula girl on my right bicep. And below the Elvis on my deltoid (when I ripple my arms or deltoids (which I can still do at my advanced age) the hula girl would make even a Haredi forget his blanket and elvis seems to smile.
    I had a PET scan and indeed my dog is a dog. Cat scan confirmed my cat is merely a cat (I had thought them, respectively, dwarfs and elves). I attribute this error on my part as too much nicotine and I freely admit this error.

  • @noworry.....is back on track with the link provided above....the thread took a little tangent there.....inter course....holes...blankets.....sounds like Hialeah Florida.....great golfing near the horse track!!
  • @asieg33 I do believe your theory does still hold weight as the differences of the neuron pathways are still there. This leads to theories regarding how nasal snuff use would be less addicting because of these differences. This also would confirm snuff taking as a superior form of tobacco use that does not sympathize with a teat in mouth neurosis.
  • @lunecat no kidding me too, I love british comedies. Spaced, Mighty Boosh, Fr. Ted, Keeping Up Appearances, Black Adder being some of my favorites.
  • noworrynoworry Member
    edited May 2013 PM
    Every snuff I use, I can taste, even on my lips and all the way down my throat, and the scent always differs from taste. It's noted that head and brain injuries can encourage these differences in reception. I always taste metal, so the snuff is a nice change for me and my neurobehavioral effects. http://ushotstuff.com/medical.htm
    FUBAR BOHICA anybody? I think I know what'll be in my next basket.
  • Juxtaposer You're gracious and a gentleman. Thank you for making me think. To think is to learn or get very dizzy (I'm waiting for white elephant the snuff as opposed to my frequent delusions while doing things other than snuff though I did stop that 3 decades ago, but snuff bullets bring back memories as does dissolving in saline and using as eye drops or dissolving in DMSO and putting on capillary rich regions of body to say nothing of...won't go there = rim on sentence but nothing compared to Thomas Mann's 138 word long sentence. An aspect of german which may have lost them the war as dispatches to the front took days to type )
    On a personal note I am neither chasid or haredi (ultra orthodox and nuts). I am a nominal apostate Jew who could say the same subbing Hindu, Buddhist, early christian or Taoist just as readily. Nothing I relish more than a ham and cheese sandwich after speaking before the chief Rabbi's (and being cautioned by friends not to be too outrageous; advice, after reading some of my posts, you will know I usually ignore, having found that the nominally important like being treated as real people)

    P.S OT - just received some fine snuff boxes and some aluminum snuff bullets. The bullets are suitable for pants pockets, need no further drilling and are excellent for fine dry snuffs.
  • noworry good link. I often had umami in sushi bars. The friends with me watched me swallow, With gusto I might add, and immediately lost their appetites. The Japanese chef smiled and gave me a few on the house and added raw quail egg.
    Sorry for the double post but I am amped on my turkish coffee and lots of snuff.
    and I feel it incumbent on myself to quote Ali G: Juxtaposer RESPECT
  • http://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/22/5/565.short
    Human Olfaction study at Univ. of Penn. Smell and Taste Center.
  • Technically the human tongue can only "taste" 4 different things; sweet, salty, bitter, sour. Its remarkably accurate in distinguishing degrees of those four, but it can't distinguish flavors from each other. That's all done in the nose.
    Some evidence suggests a 5th taste called "savory" which includes things like the flavor of mushrooms or beef or jalapenos etc.

  • @Zaratzu that is true we do have a 5th scent it is called Umami which is the equivalent to a "savory" taste.
    I'm a Perfumier by trade, and over the years I have noticed that scents do in fact alter taste, and vise versa. It may be just my overexposure to essential oils over the years although I would have to disagree with @asieg33 in regards to scents bypassing the Amygdala and going straight to the brain. If this was the case scent wouldn't trigger emotional based memories from childhood. Although I do agree with you other points made.
    For me personally taste and scent go hand in hand, when I smell something I can also sometimes taste it, if I'm woken up to the smell of bacon and eggs I can taste it for alittle bit until I fully wake up. Even when I hear certain music I can smell and sometimes taste it (this may be due to me being born with a little bit of Synesthesia) I know this is around 3 years too late although just stumbled upon this thread and interested me
Sign In or Register to comment.