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Alexis Smith Undergraduate Thesis on Snuff-Taking among Southern Women

horus92horus92 Member
edited May 2013 in Snuff House Library
I found an article somewhere referencing this paper so I got in contact with the author, Alexis Smith, and she was kind enough to email me a pdf and give me permission to share it with you all. It's quite interesting stuff, lots of primary sources.

Goes into a lot of depth, it's about 40 pages long, she talks about manufacture too, etc. A lot of the sources she cites would be interesting to examine in their own right.

Also a compelling hypothesis for where "scotch snuff" comes from - the first snuff-mill in America was owned by a scotsman, so that could be all it comes down to.

Comments

  • XanderXander Member
    The origin of the term scotch snuff is accurate, and precisely what I've always maintained, living here in Garrett country. I would add the addendum to it that it was indeed Scottish style snuff that they were reproducing in America so the term would refer to an already existing style of snuff. Her hypothesis that its meant to lend a note of grandiosity to it seems dubious and speculative.

    Gotta love the 'Miss Mackaboy' reference :-j
  • Also may be of significance that Samuel Gawith still make snuffs with Scotch in the name and that their snuff milling machinery was bought second hand in Glasgow.
  • What a great find! That you for sharing @horus92 !!!
  • MouseMouse Member
    thanks! can't decide whether I am a coneseur or an eccentric though.
  • bobbob Member
    eccentric coneseur perhaps.
  • Mike_BMike_B Member
    coneseur? Remind me--is that the dinosaur that kept a snuff horn in its dino-briefcase?
  • MouseMouse Member
    couldn't spell it, so this is what my tablet 'puter suggested.
    connoisseur :-)
  • I found an article somewhere referencing this paper so I got in contact with the author, Alexis Smith, and she was kind enough to email me a pdf and give me permission to share it with you all. It's quite interesting stuff, lots of primary sources...
    Thanks for sharing a most interesting PDF. The only Scotch snuff I’ve tried is Swisher’s Three Thistle Strong and after the first snuff, almost through it into the garbage and move on. I’m glad I didn’t. Over the last few weeks I’ve come to enjoy its instant nicotine hit and the resulting blast in the back of my head. After reading the full PDF file and acquainting myself with Scotch snuff I came to the following conclusion. This is a snuff that advertises the user no promise of social acceptance from beautiful people; there are no visions of eighteenth century gentlemen relaxing in their Club over a glass of expensive brandy and enjoying the finest snuff; -this is hard hitting no nonsense snuff and I’ve come to love it.
  • Thanks for sharing, @horus92 - a most informative thesis, especially as it is purely concerned with womens' snuff taking. Not sure I necessarily agree with some of her points - she obviously hasn't taken snuff and falls into the old trap of saying that snuffers MUST have got nasal cancer from usage. As you said, some of her sources would be interesting to follow up.
  • Thanks for sharing, @horus92 - a most informative thesis, especially as it is purely concerned with womens' snuff taking. Not sure I necessarily agree with some of her points - she obviously hasn't taken snuff and falls into the old trap of saying that snuffers MUST have got nasal cancer from usage. As you said, some of her sources would be interesting to follow up.
    I agree with your comments and thought the same thing about some of her conclusions especially regarding the nasal cancer.

  • Thanks for sharing this interesting doc.
  • "Scotch" snuff - seems snuff making in Glasgow predated Kendal. Thomas Harrison (whose company is known to us all under the name of his grandson-in-law, Samuel Gawith) learned the craft in Glasgow before founding the first Kendal mill (using the same milling hardware still in use at Gawith's today).

    Check here.

    HTH
  • Thanks for sharing this pdf. It looks to be a good read.
  • woul`d someone please repostthe pdf? thanks!
  • I second smasty's request. I know this an old thread but please post again if possible. Never hurts to ask.
  • markstinsonmarkstinson Administrator
    @cpmcdill, thanks for posting that. Does anyone have the PDF of the actual article? Would love to read it.

    Mark
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