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Odens and Siberia by the roll.

Snuff history - A brief summary for Toques website

RoderickRoderick Member
edited September 2012 in Snuffhouse Archives
I am writing a brief history of snuff for the toque website and could think of no better proof readers than the forum members.
Can you add anything to this summary?
Is there some gem of knowledge I have missed?

One of the most interesting finds was, that John Hill wasn’t a Doctor at all. It turns out he was a poet and writer of English farce, who only pretended to be a Doctor as he was annoyed with the size of his tobacco bill and wanted to get back at his tobacconist.

Any help, as always, gratefully received.
Roderick

Snuff History
Pre 15th Century
The parent species of Nicotiana Rustica and Nicotiana Tabacum have been cultivated as far back as 8,000 years ago, and maybe the first cultivated plant of the Americas.

Historians guess that somewhere between 470 and 630 A.D. the Mayas, who are documented as being the first users of snuff and of smoking Nicotiana Rustica, which they may have called Petun, began to scatter, some moving as far as the Mississippi Valley. The Toltecs, who created the mighty Aztec Empire, borrowed the smoking custom from the Mayas and two types of smokers emerged. Those in the Court of Montezuma, who mingled the leaves of Nicotiana Rustica, with the resin of other leaves and smoked pipes with great ceremony after their evening meal; and the lesser Indians, who rolled the leaves together to form a crude cigar.

The Mayas who settled in the Mississippi Valley spread their custom to the neighboring tribes. The Ojibwa/Chippewa tribe adapted smoking to their own religion, believing that their god, the almighty Manitou, revealed himself in the rising smoke.

As in Southern America, a complex system of religious and political rites was developed around the burning and smoking of the leaves of these plants. No one really knows how long American Indians had been smoking, chewing and snuffing before the 15th century. A best guess puts it around 2000 years before Columbus.

There is little credence given to the idea that Vikings were the first Europeans to experience smoking however it is possible as there is evidence that they beat Columbus to America by many centuries.

15th Century

Europeans first came in contact with Cohiba, Taino Indians name for the rolled leaves of the Nicotiana Tabacum, when they reached the island of Cuba. In October 1492 Christopher Columbus and his men stepped ashore and were greeted by the indigenous people who gave them many gifts among them some dried leaves which they conveyed to the Spanish explorers were enormously precious.

The monk Ramon Pane joined Columbus on his second journey to America in 1497 and at that time came in contact with Nicotiana Rustica and Nicotiana Tabacum. Pane witnessed the drinking of smoke through a “Y” shaped stick called a Tobacco, the natives called the stick a tobacco and Pane probably confused it with the smoke from the leaves hence his naming the leaves tobacco. Pane also saw Indian priests inhale ground leaves (snuff) through their nose using a hollow reed, according to historians this powder was hallucinogenic and consisted of tobacco ground with an unknown herb. Snuffing became the most popular method of tobacco usage when it was introduced in Europe.

16th Century

The tobacco plant was brought to Europe through Spanish and Portuguese sailors. In Lisbon in the middle of the 16th century snuff was used as medicine by doctors who believed that the herb could cure both syphilis and cancer. They grew the tobacco in their own gardens and ground their own snuff.

Jean Nicot
Jean Nicot, the French ambassador to Lisbon is recognized as the father of snuff usage. Carl von Linné even used Nicot’s name to give the tobacco plant the Latin name, Nicotiana tabacum.

Nicot was friendly with the scholar and botanist Damião de Goes, de Goes showed him a tobacco plant growing in his garden and told him of its marvellous healing properties. The application of the tobacco plant to a cancerous tumor allegedly worked wonders. Nicot tried treating an acquaintance's face wound for 10 days with the plant with excellent results. He became convinced of the healing powers of tobacco.

Nicot obtained cuttings which he planted in the garden of the French Embassy and in 1560 he wrote of tobacco's medicinal properties. He described tobacco as a panacea and in the same year sent tobacco plants to the French court and snuff to Catherine de Medici, the Queen of France, to treat her migraine headaches. Nicot had applied it to his nose and forehead and found it had relieved his headaches. Catherine de Medici used it to cure her migraines and was so impressed that she decreed that tobacco was henceforth to be called Herba Regina, the "queen's herb". With the Queens blessing it was not long before snuff became the fashion item of the French court.

17th Century

Paris served as a model for all the European courts and it was not long before snuff had spread across mainland Europe and to Scotland through ‘The Auld Alliance’. Although some Scottish nobles visiting England were seen using snuff it remained relatively unknown and England had to wait nearly 100 years until in 1660 the court of Charles II returned to London from exile in Paris, bringing with them the French court’s snuffing practice. Snuff became the aristocratic form of tobacco use, replacing the common practice of “huffing” or taking the vapours.

Unfortunately for users, snuff underwent a period of prohibition across Europe in the late 17th and early 18th century. Tsar Michael I of Russia ordered that persons caught taking snuff should be whipped for the first offence, have their noses cut off for the second and be executed for the third (there are no records of anyone ever being executed, probably due to it being difficult to snuff without a nose). Around the same time the Florentine Pope Urban VIII ordered that anyone found guilty of taking snuff in church should be excommunicated because he believed it led to sneezing which too closely resembled sexual ecstasy.

Portuguese tradesmen and Jesuit missionaries, the same priests who would have been excommunicated for using snuff back home, first introduced Snuff to China in the 17th Century. Tobacco had been seen in China, in the form of pipe smoking at the beginning of the century and earlier. There is a strong possibility that Vasco de Gama had started trading Tobacco in 1560 with India, Persia and China. In 1612, the Wan-Li Emperor of China banned smoking but not snuff, due to its therapeutic significance. By the time of the Qing Dynasty in 1644 snuff had become very popular and to many it was regarded as a medicine. Which partly accounts for snuff being kept in Chinese medicine bottles, however a more likely reason lay in Chinas humid climate, snuff boxes were found impractical and this led to the adaption of Chinese medicine bottles for storing snuff.
The Chinese, following Jean Nicot’s example, claimed that snuff could be used to dispel colds, cure migraines, sinusitis, tooth pain, asthma, constipation and that it was beneficial for those with poor memories. (Today scientists are discovering that nicotine is helpful in the treatment of Alzheimer's, Dementia and Parkinson's disease).

18th Century
Snuff became much more popular with ordinary Britain’s due to a battle that took place off the coast of Vigo in Spain in 1702. The French and Spanish fleet were harboured at Vigo and a detachment of fifteen English and ten Dutch men-of-war were ordered to enter and attempt the destruction of the enemy’s fleet. Vice-Admiral Hopson in the Torbay led the attack, his cannon fire was incredibly accurate and most of the enemy was destroyed. One of the Spanish ships, which was on fire, came perilously close and Hobson was on the point of blowing it out of the water when an English cabin boy captured by the Spanish and rescued by Hobson, alerted him to the cargo. This ship had been hastily prepared and was actually a merchant ship full of snuff, the fire was quickly extinguished and Hobson claimed the lot as booty. To top it all, Hobson was knighted and awarded a pension of £500 a year for his part in this battle and the bounty of snuff was sold in London, the profits of which bought him an estate fit for a Knighted Admiral. Hobson’s snuff was referred to as Spanish, which soon became abbreviated to ‘SP’ one of the best known and most popular of snuffs.
The French revolution led to the end of the French upper classes love of traditional snuff, no upper class, no snuff sales. Under Napoleon, who was a heavy snuffer, snuff sales temporarily increased but after his exile it became unfashionable and even a little politically risky to continue using snuff.

This century also saw the first warnings about the use of tobacco. John Hill, an 18th Century poet and writer of farces pretended to be a Doctor after an argument with his tobacconist about the size of his tobacco bill. He proclaimed that overusing snuff tobacco could lead to nasal cancers, now happily disproved by the Royal College of Physicians. The likely cause of the rise in nasal cancer at this time has been attributed to the period’s smokers blowing smoke through their noses in order to block the horrendous smells caused by the build up of rubbish in the streets of cities and towns all over Britain. Interestingly with better sewage systems smokers stopped blowing smoke through their noses and nasal cancer ceased to be.

19th Century
In the 19th century snuff was still popular in many parts of society across Europe, although Victorian England became less tolerant of the habit and snuff started to be frowned upon in some quarters. Snuff was, however, popular amongst the professions where it wasn’t possible to smoke or to be seen to smoke such as Doctors, Lawyers, Judges, Clergymen and of course Miners.
During the nineteenth century, snuff was so popular in the Chinese community that millions of Chinese snuff bottles were made, which makes collecting them and snuff boxes in general an affordable hobby for the snuff enthusiast.
20th Century
The First World War saw the virtual death knell for snuff, as cigarette companies literally flooded the trenches with free cigarettes and returning soldiers made smoking fashionable.
After the 1949 communist revolution in China Moa outlawed snuff as a decadent habit of the previous Qing dynasty.

21st Century

Today snuff is undergoing some thing of a renaissance and Toque now sells snuff all over the world including China. Could the smoking bans of the twenty-first century result in the decline of cigarettes and make snuff once more fashionable. Today many smokers are switching to Toque snuff not only because of the bans but also because the medical fraternities are now informing smokers that snuff is a dramatically less harmful alternative to cigarettes.

Comments

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • LazarusLazarus Member
    edited June 2008 PM
    Yes, excellent job Roderick. I especially found the part about John Hill faking his medical background in order to slander snuff and damage his local tobaconists business very interesting!
  • Thats great Roderick!

    One thing though, I wouldn't use "death knell" twice so close together, sounds a bit odd.
  • MattMatt Member
    The monk Ramon Pane joined Columbus on his second journey to America in 1497 and at that time came in contact with the precursor of nasal snuff. Pane saw Indian priests inhale ground tobacco (snuff) through their nose using a hollow reed, according to historians this powder was hallucinogenic and consisted of tobacco ground with an unknown herb. However the method of snuffing became the most popular method of tobacco usage when it was introduced in Europe.

    The last line, specifically "the method of snuffing," is unclear to me. Especially since "method" is used twice in the sentence. I'd say "the practice of snuffing" perhaps, or just leave off the beginning of that sentence all together and say: "Snuffing became the most popular method of tobacco usage when it was introduced in Europe."
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • bobbob Member
    I agree with matt. Too me it makes it sound like the europeans where using the hallucinagenic snuff too.
  • Very nice read Roderick, I found it to be very educational. There were bits there I was not aware of. Thanks!
  • Thanks Guys, I've made the changes, but I've also researched some other issues that I can't reslove.
    I think I may have got the Manitou tribe mixed up with the Chippewa who had a spirit god called Manitou who would appear when they smoked (probably the herbs they mixed in). I'm also curious about the word "uppowoc" the name for Nicotiana Tabacum, is this a Chippewa word? Another interesting thing that I will have to add is that the word Tobacco is wrong. A tobacco is a "Y" shaped hollow tube like stick used to inhale the smoke when the leaves are burnt. You learn something new everyday.
  • Just a side comment. In a recent TV documentary on the history of human migrations, gas chromatography analysis of Egyptian mummies revealed the presence of nicotine and cocaine. This supports the idea that there was contact and trade between the original Americans and ancient Egyptians. It also hints at what other "herbs" may have been.

    This begs the question why tobacco was not grown in Egypt for another couple thousand years or so. Perhaps the Americans were smart enough to preserve their monopoly on tobacco. Of course the tobacco and coca may have been chewed or sniffed.
  • Some of the "hallucinogenic" effects were do to the fact that the strain of tobacco was way stronger than what we know today.

    stitch, it would be hard to say since nicotine is found in plants other than tobacco. Tobacco is in the nightshade family which also contains potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant and red peppers. All these contain nicotine. And you know there are areas across Egypt and the rest of Africa that used to be green, thriving with plant life. But in just the past few thousand years are now just dry sand dunes or rocky deserts. So its possible that if some theories are right about the continents splitting away from each other that tobacco plants as well as coca were found on the African continent naturally for some time. Its possible that these plants used to be found elsewhere but are now extinct to that region. There are just so many mysteries to the past.
  • Well done Rodrick
    Makes for a nice read , and is informative, to everyone, most all family's have a tie to tobacco use.
    Tobacco for a whole, has gotten a bad rap.
    Most because of cigarette company propaganda.
  • LazarusLazarus Member
    edited June 2008 PM
    Well smoking tobacco does cause disease which is why it gets such bad press...the trouble with smoking tobacco is that it doesn't only damage the person doing it but everyone standing near them. Thats one of the reasons why I love snuff, you don't need to worry about potentially harming anyone but yourself :o)
  • What about the Neanderthals? Didn't they use tobacco? I'm pretty sure the Cro magnon got the idea from them! Right? But seriously I'm quite proud of you Roderick and I'm enjoying some of your Toque Chocolate as I type this.
  • Snuff History
    Pre 15th Century
    The parent species of Nicotiana Rustica and Nicotiana Tabacum have been cultivated as far back as 8,000 years ago, and maybe the first cultivated plant of the Americas.

    Historians guess that somewhere between 470 and 630 A.D. the Mayas, who are documented as being the first users of snuff and of smoking Nicotiana Rustica, which they may have called Petun, began to scatter, some moving as far as the Mississippi Valley. [< - RUN ON SENTENCE. CONSIDER RE-WRITE: It is documented that the Mayas were the first to use snuff and smoke Nicotiana Rustica, which they may have called Petun. Historians believe that between 470 and 630 A.D. they began to scatter, some migrating as far as the Mississippi Valley.] The Toltecs, who created the mighty Aztec Empire, borrowed the smoking custom from the Mayas and two types of smokers emerged. [EDITED: The first group were in the Court of Montezuma, who mingled the leaves of Nicotiana Rustica with the resin of other leaves. This mixture was smoked in pipes with great ceremony after their evening meal. The second group was one of lesser Indians, who rolled the leaves together to form a crude cigar.]

    The Mayas who settled in the Mississippi Valley spread their custom[s?] to the neighboring tribes. The Ojibwa/Chippewa tribe adapted smoking to their own religion, believing that their god, the almighty Manitou, revealed himself in the rising smoke.

    As in Southern America, a complex system of religious and political rites was developed around the burning and smoking of the leaves of these plants. No one really knows how long American Indians had been smoking, chewing and snuffing before the 15th century. A best guess puts it around 2000 years before Columbus.

    There is little credence given to the idea that Vikings were the first Europeans to experience smoking however it is possible[comma here] as there is evidence that they beat Columbus to America by many centuries.

    15th Century

    [EDITED: Europeans first came in contact with Cohiba [and, or is the comma better?] Taino Indians when they reached the island of Cuba. They were thus named because they smoked Nicotiana Tabacum. On October 1492 Christopher Columbus and his men stepped ashore and were greeted by the indigenous people. They were given many gifts, among them some extremely precious dried leaves which they conveyed [passed on?] to the Spanish explorers.]

    At work and out of time. Will continue later.

    Overall, very well written. Just a few run-on sentences, which plague many a writer.

    Phaedrus
  • Thanks to everyone for all your help. I'll acknowledge snuffhouse members, on my website, when we add the snuff history.
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • What about the women angle? Wasn't it unacceptable for women to smoke in society at one point so they snuffed instead?
  • The monk Ramon Pane joined Columbus on his second journey to America in 1497 and at that time came in contact with Nicotiana Rustica and Nicotiana Tabacum. [EDIT: SPLIT SENTENCE IN TWO: Pane witnessed the drinking of smoke through a “Y” shaped stick called a Tobacco. The natives called the stick a tobacco and Pane probably confused it with the smoke from the leaves, hence his ascribing the name to the leaves.] Pane also saw Indian priests inhale ground leaves (snuff) through their nose using a hollow reed[PERIOD HERE, NEW SENTENCE->]. According to historians this powder was hallucinogenic and consisted of tobacco ground with an unknown herb. Snuffing became the most popular method of tobacco usage when it was introduced in Europe.

    16th Century

    The tobacco plant was brought to Europe through Spanish and Portuguese sailors. In Lisbon in the middle of the 16th century snuff was used as medicine by doctors[,] who believed that the herb could cure both syphilis and cancer. They grew the tobacco in their own gardens and ground their own snuff.

    Jean Nicot
    Jean Nicot, the French ambassador to Lisbon is recognized as the father of snuff usage. Carl von Linné even used Nicot’s name to give the tobacco plant the Latin name, Nicotiana tabacum.

    Nicot was friendly with the scholar and botanist Damião de Goes, [who] showed him a tobacco plant growing in his garden and told him of its marvellous healing properties. The application of the tobacco plant to a cancerous tumor allegedly worked wonders. Nicot tried treating an acquaintance's face wound for 10 days with the plant with excellent results. He became convinced of the healing powers of tobacco.

    Nicot obtained cuttings[,] which he planted in the garden of the French Embassy[. NEW SENTENCE->] In 1560 he wrote of tobacco's medicinal properties. [SENTENCE EDITED: He described tobacco as a panacea and in the same year sent tobacco plants and snuff to Catherine de Medici, the Queen of France. He recommended the snuff to treat her migraine headaches. ] Nicot had applied it to his nose and forehead and found it had relieved his headaches. Catherine de Medici used it to cure her migraines and was so impressed that she decreed that tobacco was henceforth to be called Herba Regina, [should be either "the queen's herb", or simply "queen's herb"]. With the Queen[']s blessing it was not long before snuff became the [italicise "the" perhaps?] fashion item of the French court.

    17th Century

    Paris served as a model for all the European courts and it was not long before snuff had spread across mainland Europe and to Scotland through ‘The Auld Alliance’. [RUN ON SENTENCE, EDITED: Despite the fact that visiting Scottish nobles were seen using snuff, it remained relatively unknown in England until 1660. It was then that the court of Charles II returned to London from exile in Paris, bringing with them the French court’s snuffing practice.] Snuff became the aristocratic form of tobacco use, replacing the common practice of “huffing” or taking the vapours.

    Unfortunately for users, snuff underwent a period of prohibition across Europe in the late 17th and early 18th century. Tsar Michael I of Russia ordered that persons caught taking snuff should be whipped for the first offence, have their noses cut off for the second and be executed for the third (there are no records of anyone ever being executed, probably due to it being difficult to snuff without a nose). Around the same time the Florentine Pope Urban VIII ordered that anyone found guilty of taking snuff in church should be excommunicated[END SENTENCE]. This was because he believed it led to sneezing[,] which too closely resembled sexual ecstasy.

    Portuguese tradesmen and Jesuit missionaries, the same priests who would have been excommunicated for using snuff back home, first introduced Snuff to China in the 17th Century. Tobacco had been seen in China, in the form of pipe smoking [before the turn of the century?]. There is a strong possibility that Vasco de Gama had started trading Tobacco in 1560 with India, Persia and China. In 1612, the Wan-Li Emperor of China banned smoking[,] but not snuff, due to its therapeutic significance. By the time of the Qing Dynasty in 1644 snuff had become very popular and to many it was regarded as a medicine. [This] partly accounts for snuff being kept in Chinese medicine bottles[.] [H]owever[,] a more likely reason lay in China[']s humid climate[.] Snuff boxes were found impractical and this led to the adaption of Chinese medicine bottles for storing snuff.
    The Chinese, following Jean Nicot’s example, claimed that snuff could be used to dispel colds, cure migraines, sinusitis, tooth pain, asthma, constipation and that it was beneficial for those with poor memories. [Parantheses may not be necessary?] (Today scientists are discovering that nicotine is helpful in the treatment of Alzheimer's, Dementia and Parkinson's disease).

    18th Century
    Snuff became much more popular with ordinary Britain’s [the commoners of Britain or British citizens? ordinary Britain's doesn't make sense] due to a battle that took place off the coast of Vigo in Spain in 1702. The French and Spanish fleet were harboured at Vigo and a detachment of fifteen English and ten Dutch [soldiers] were ordered to enter and attempt [to destroy] the enemy’s fleet. Vice-Admiral Hopson [if the Torbay was a ship, it should be "of the Torbay"] led the attack[;] his cannon fire was incredibly accurate and most of the [enemy vessels or enemy's ships were] destroyed. One of the Spanish ships, which was on fire, came perilously close [to their own ship. Hobson was about to blow it out of the water when an English cabin boy, who had been captured by the Spanish and later rescued by Hobson, informed him of the cargo.] This [makeshift warship] had been hastily prepared and was actually a merchant ship full of snuff[. T]he fire was quickly extinguished and Hobson claimed the lot as booty. To top it all, Hobson was knighted and awarded a pension of £500 a year for his part in this battle[. T]he bounty of snuff was sold in London, the profits of which bought him an estate fit for a Knighted Admiral. Hobson’s snuff was referred to as Spanish, which soon became abbreviated to ‘SP’ one of the best known and most popular of snuffs.
    The French revolution led to the end of the French upper class[']s love of traditional snuff[:] No upper class, no snuff sales. Under Napoleon, who was a heavy snuffer, snuff sales temporarily increased but after his exile it became unfashionable and even a little politically risky to continue using snuff.

    This century also saw the first warnings about the use of tobacco. [After an argument with his tobacconist about his bill, John Hill, an 18th Century poet and writer of farces, released a public notice. Under the guise of a Doctor, he proclaimed that the overuse of snuff could lead to nasal cancers, which has since been (fortunately) disprove[n] by the Royal College of Physicians. The likely cause of the rise in nasal cancer at this time has been attributed to the period’s smokers blowing smoke through their noses[. This was done] to block the horrendous smells caused by the build up of rubbish in the streets of cities and towns all over Britain. Interestingly with better sewage systems smokers stopped blowing smoke through their noses and nasal cancer ceased to be.

    19th Century
    In the 19th century snuff was still popular in many parts of society across Europe, although Victorian England became less tolerant of the habit and snuff started to be frowned upon in some quarters. Snuff was, however, popular amongst the professions where it wasn’t possible to smoke or to be seen to smoke such as Doctors, Lawyers, Judges, Clergymen and of course Miners.
    During the nineteenth century[no comma] snuff was so popular in the Chinese community that millions of Chinese snuff bottles were made, which makes collecting them and snuff boxes in general an affordable hobby for the snuff enthusiast.
    20th Century
    The First World War saw the virtual death knell for snuff, as cigarette companies literally flooded the trenches with free cigarettes and returning soldiers made smoking fashionable.
    After the 1949 communist revolution in China[,] Moa outlawed snuff as a decadent habit of the previous Qing dynasty.

    21st Century

    Today snuff is undergoing some thing of a renaissance and Toque now sells snuff all over the world including China. Could the smoking bans of the twenty-first century result in the decline of cigarettes and make snuff once more fashionable[?] Today many smokers are switching to Toque snuff not only because of the bans but also because the medical fraternities are now informing smokers that snuff is a dramatically less harmful alternative to cigarettes.

    Again, overall well written, mostly just some run-on sentences. Anything with a ? after it means it's not a necessary grammatical change, but rather simply a suggestion of a possible alternative. Hope I wasn't too late to help.

    Phaedrus
  • Damn Homer; looks like you're getting edited to death here. Sorry Roderick; I just couldn't resist it. I will try not to do it again.
  • Phaedrus, Thank you very much. Up the Republic!
    Only one of his books I ever attempted. 20 years of picking it up and putting it down and I still can’t make head nor tale of it.
    I am very grateful for all the help from the forum with the input and re-edit.
    The history should be on the site by the end of the month, with a big thanks to snuffhouse.
    Roderick
  • TroutstrokerTroutstroker Member
    edited June 2008 PM
    Roderick,
    Here is a good read for some other facts if your interested. The snuff history begins on page 3 but the rest is interesting as well.

    Snuff History.
  • Thanks Trout,
    Which book is that from? I don't think I have it in my ref books.
    The one thing I still can't find out is why snuff shops had Scotsmen outside their doors. Does anyone known for definite?
    Roderick
  • Thereby hangs a tale. According to Compton Mackenzie's Sublime Tobacco p. 191: In 1720 "an Edinburgh man, David Wishart, who had opened a snuff-shop in London in Coventry Street, set up outside it the figure of a six-foot Highlander in doublet and trews with a targe on his arm and a claymore by his side. There was no snuff-mull in his hand, he stood there in Coventry Street not to advertise David Wishart's wares but to let loyal gentleman know that at the back of the shop they might discuss safely the prospect of the King's coming into his own again...The Scottish tobacco-dealers in London recognized the attraction of that Highlander outside Wishart's shop in the Haymarket; presently he was given the kilt instead of trews and instead of of a targe and claymore a snuff-mull in his hand, to become the recognized sign of the tobacconist who kept the best snuff in variety."
  • Wooden Bygones Of Smoking & Snuff Taking by Edward H. Pinto is a great little book on the subject.
  • Its a monograph from the IARC which is the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
  • Another excellent source is Snuff and snuff boxes by Hugh Macausland, Batchwoth press, London. I don't know if you are planning to say anything much about snuff boxes, but they play an integral part in the social hsitory of snuffing, particularly in the 18th C - the development of the Laurencekirk box by the Scot James Sandy, which became a massive industry and the use of snuff boxes as propaganda - for example ones shaped like Napoleans hat and the cheap papier mache boxes that had political cartoons or even rudimentary pornography on them.
  • THAT'S GREAT RODERICK!!!!!! Thanks very much indeed for the Snuff History!!!

    Your fellow Spanish

    Pedro
  • betonentebetonente Member
    edited June 2008 PM
    according to http://heritage.news.tom.com/Archive/2001/7/31-62371.html snuff was still sold in the 60s in Hongkong in at least one specialized snuff store.
    but (according to the same site) snuff use fell out of favour in general after 1914,which is the yearthe Qing-dynasty was brought to an end. snuffing was seen as a remain of feudal order then.
    maybe its also wotyh mentioning that the great Qing emperors Kangxi and Qianlong were very fond of snuff. (you mention western monarchs a lot, why not the same for chinese)
    (strangely the same text also pops up under http://www.snuff-bottle.net/knowledge/snuff.htm)

    off topic: also, in chinese too, the term snuff (鼻烟, "nasal smoke") seems to be also used to refer to snus. (at least in http://www.tobaccochina.com/news/data/20055/w_3450864_11163713.htm)
This discussion has been closed.